Biomechanical analysis of a underhand volleyball serve

What are the optimal biomechanics for a Volleyball serve? Introduction The volleyball serve is a closed skill, players have the option of deciding when to initiate the feed throw and also when to make the connection. They are also capable of dictating the accuracy and power of the serve.

Biomechanical analysis of a underhand volleyball serve

This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. The shoulder is the third-most commonly injured body part in volleyball, with the majority of shoulder problems resulting from chronic overuse.

Significant kinetic differences exist among specific types of volleyball serves and spikes. Fourteen healthy female collegiate volleyball players performed 5 successful trials of 4 skills: Volunteers who were competent in jump serves n, 5 performed 5 trials of that skill.

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A Hz 3-dimensional automatic digitizing system captured each trial. Multivariate analysis of variance and post hoc paired t tests were used to compare kinetic parameters for the shoulder and elbow across all the skills except the jump serve. A similar statistical analysis was performed for upper extremity kinematics.

Forces, torques, and angular velocities at the shoulder and elbow were lowest for the roll shot and second-lowest for the float serve.

No differences were detected between the cross-body and straight-ahead spikes. Although there was an insufficient number of participants to statistically analyze the jump serve, the data for it appear similar to those of the cross-body and straight-ahead spikes.

Because shoulder kinetics were greatest during spiking, the volleyball player with symptoms of shoulder overuse may wish to reduce the number of repetitions performed during practice.

Volleyball-specific overhead skills, such as the spike and serve, produce considerable upper extremity force and torque, which may contribute to the risk of shoulder injury. However, the consequences of time-loss shoulder injuries are not trivial. Verhagen et al 32 reported that the mean time loss from a volleyball-related shoulder injury is approximately 6.

Of the overhead volleyball skills, the spike is perhaps the most explosive. Spikes, or attacks, are typically high-velocity shots ball speeds can approach 28 m per second.

Biomechanical analysis of a underhand volleyball serve

Two serving styles predominate: The float serve remains the most popular serve employed by female collegiate volleyball players. Reeser et al determined that athletes who perform the jump serve are more likely to experience shoulder problems than are those who use the float serve.

Biomechanics of Volleyball: What biomechanical principles are involved in a volleyball serve?

Rinderu 26 found that the maximal glenohumeral joint reaction force during spiking was greater in male players than in female players. In a small study n, 6Plawinski compared upper extremity kinetics between spikes directed straight ahead and those driven across the body and reported few differences.Jun 18,  · Individual biomechanical composition.

Evidently, there are many aspects contributing to the skill of the volleyball jump serve. From the above analysis of the skill, I have considered key aspects which would prove useful for the successful implementation of the jump serve skill. The final part of the volleyball serve is the follow through, which its main aspect in the volleyball serve is to provide greater accuracy.

By continuing the range of motion well past the impact of the ball in the direction intended, the balls flight path is .

Transcript of Biomechanics of a Volleyball Serve. Biomechanics of a Top Spin Overhand Volleyball Serve Proper Technique for a Top Spin Overhand Serve Biomechanical Mechanisms involved in overhand serving Impact-Collision and exchange of force during short time interval.

SASK VOLLEYBALL – UNDERHAND SERVE 6 5) UNDERHAND TOSS - OVER the net PAIRS Drill progression: 1 ball/pair Step + underhand toss the ball OVER the net Partners on opposite sides of the net, facing one another.

Biomechanical principles involved in the Volleyball serve: Major Question

Partners 3 – 4 steps back from the net Drill completion: underhand toss the ball back and forth (5X). transcript of biomechanical analysis of the overarm serve in volleyball Any activity requires the correct technique to use the available force and effect to maximum advantage"- (Physical Education: Theory and Practice Davis, Kimmet and Auty, page ).

Major Question: What are the optimal biomechanics for a Volleyball serve? The volleyball serve is a closed skill, players have the option of deciding when to initiate the feed (throw) and also when to make the connection.

Biomechanical analysis of a underhand volleyball serve

They are also capable of dictating the accuracy and power of the serve. The biomechanical principles highlighted.

The Volleyball Jump Serve – A Biomechanical Analysis – biomechanicsofthevolleyballserve