Lead and manage

It is a question that has been asked more than once and also answered in different ways. The biggest difference between managers and leaders is the way they motivate the people who work or follow them, and this sets the tone for most other aspects of what they do. Many people, by the way, are both. They have management jobs, but they realize that you cannot buy hearts, especially to follow them down a difficult path, and so act as leaders too.

Lead and manage

One of the biggest areas of confusion is in understanding how the role of a leader is different to that of a manager.

Lead and manage

How the Focus of Leadership and Management Differs The distinction between management and leadership is useful as it helps to provide a clear understanding of leadership and how it differs from the role of management.

Daft, Leadership Theory and Practice.

In summary

This definition is similar to how many others have defined management. The focus of management is planning, organising, execution, command and control.

The focus of leadership is on the social process of change, driven by vision, influence and relationship. Lead and manage is characterised by the following: Management is characterised by the following: A focus on maintaining Lead and manage and control to achieve order and predictability A focus on systems and structures to deal with complexity Leverages controls to influence outcomes Defines strategy and tactics to achieve a goal Establishes direction through planning and budgeting Organizes resources, budgets, process, roles and responsibilities Measures and governs progress Creates alignment by organizing resources, controlling and creating boundaries Establishes authority as the foundation of relationships Establishes processes and controls for how work gets done The above lists provide an overview of the differences between the role of manager and the role of manager.

John Kottera New York Times best-selling author and Harvard Professor, provides us the following observation on the nature of management and leadership. Leadership, then, is about learning how to cope with rapid change. Leadership is about dealing with change.

The greater the change the greater the need for leadership. This difference is one of the reasons for an increased emphasis on leadership over the past few decades. More change demands more leadership. Management and leadership are two distinct approaches.

Leaders places emphasis on people, whilst management is about control and predictable results. Managers take a more rational approach, leaders stir the passions and emotions of people. Managers work within the culture of the organization. Managers rely on rational, intellect and control to organize people and resources towards an outcome.

Management is about controlling the work that other people do. Leaders take a different approach, where managers seek to limit choices and to control outcomes, leaders seek to develop fresh approaches and new ways of thinking about opportunities.

They get things done through influence, collaboration and inspiration. Whereas management is an appointment. Both of these systems of action are required for success. The management system focus is on the hard stuff, the plans, controls and measures.

You manage things, but you lead people. Debates about which role is better or more important miss the point. Henry Mintzberg the widely regarded management expert makes the following important point concerning the role of a leader and that of a manager.

My view is that management without leadership is disheartening or discouraging. The reason for distinguishing between the two roles is not for the purpose of putting people into one of the two boxes. Certain situations require more of a leadership role, such as creating meaning, purpose and inspiring people and other situations require more management, such as exercising control and driving execution.

Management and leadership are needed to make organisations successful. Trying to decide if leadership or management is more important is like trying to decide if you need both the left and right wing on your airplane! The best performing enterprises have behavioural traits of leadership, vision, purpose, inspiration, influence, collaboration supported by the management capabilities of process, measurement, controls and plans.

Management processes and systems are most effective when supported by strong leadership practices. Organisations require vision, innovation and change as much as they require efficiency, governance and execution.The problem with dichotomies, however fun, is that they are overt and sometimes misleading oversimplifications.

But in the real world tidy constructs become messes, and . This unit describes the performance outcomes, skills and knowledge required to lead and manage people including in teams and support and encourage their commitment to the organisation. It requires the ability to lead by example and manage performance through effective leadership.

Management and leadership are important for the delivery of good health services.

Classifications

Although the two are similar in some respects, they may involve diff erent types of outlook, skills, and behaviours. Good managers should strive to be good leaders and good leaders, need management skills to be eff ective.

Modification History. Not applicable.

Lead and manage

Application. This unit describes the performance outcomes, skills and knowledge required to lead and manage people including in teams and support and encourage their commitment to the organisation. The problem with dichotomies, however fun, is that they are overt and sometimes misleading oversimplifications.

But in the real world tidy constructs become messes, and dichotomies become continuums. Management and leadership are important for the delivery of good health services. Although the two are similar in some respects, they may involve diff erent types of outlook, skills, and behaviours.

Good managers should strive to be good leaders and good leaders, need management skills to be eff ective.

Lead management - Wikipedia